Lymphoma

Non-Hodgkin lymphomas (NHLs) represent a clinically and genetically heterogeneous group of lymphoproliferative disorders that arise in mature B lymphocytes and T lymphocytes or natural killer cells.1,2 Among the B-cell NHLs, the more common forms include follicular lymphoma (FL), diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL), and mantle cell lymphoma (MCL), and marginal zone lymphoma (MZL).1 FL is characterized by an indolent course of disease, whereas DLBCL and MCL exhibit a more aggressive clinical course of disease.3-5 T-cell lymphomas also comprise a heterogeneous group of hematologic malignancies, which include peripheral T-cell lymphomas and cutaneous T-cell lymphoma.6,7 The molecular pathogenesis of NHLs is driven by a variety of chromosomal abnormalities and somatic mutations that alter the epigenetic landscape, gene expression, and cellular function of lymphocytes.3-8Testing for the presence of specific proteins on the surface of B and T cells (ie, immunophenotyping) is important in the diagnosis of NHLs.1,9

Explore a 3-D lymph node cross section to review disease pathogenesis and diagnostic criteria for the sub-types of non-Hodgkin lymphoma. Share this interactive resource with your patients to further their understanding of the disease.

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Non-hodgkin Lymphoma

Click on the '+' icons over the various parts of the lymph node cross section to explore areas of origin and diagnostic criteria for the sub-types of non-Hodgkin lymphoma.

Disease State Healthy State

Use the navigation buttons on the right to zoom into areas of interest, zoom out to see surrounding structures, center your view,
draw on a 2D snapshot, or email a 3D interactive link.

Mantle Cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma

Use the toggle buttons below to see the combinations of surface markers on the B-cells in mantle cell lymphoma cancer cells compared with normal B-cells which may have fewer and different combinations of surface markers.

Disease State Healthy State
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Diffuse Large B-Cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma

Use the toggle buttons below to see the combinations of surface markers on diffuse large B-cell lymphoma cancer cells compared with normal B-cells which may have fewer and different combinations of surface markers.

Disease State Healthy State
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Marginal Zone Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma

Use the toggle buttons below to see the combinations of surface markers on B-cells in marginal zone lymphoma cancer cells compared with normal B-cells which may have fewer and different combinations of surface markers.

Disease State Healthy State
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Follicular Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma

Use the toggle buttons below to see the combinations of surface markers on B-cells in follicular lymphoma cancer cells compared with normal B-cells which may have fewer and different combinations of surface markers.

Disease State Healthy State
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Cutaneous T-Cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma

Use the toggle buttons below to see the combinations of surface markers on T-cells in cutaneous T-cell lymphoma cancer cells compared with normal T-cells which may have fewer and different combinations of surface markers.

Disease State Healthy State
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Peripheral T-Cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma

Use the toggle buttons below to see the combinations of surface markers on T-cells in peripheral T-cell lymphoma cancer cells compared with normal T-cells which may have fewer and different combinations of surface markers.

Disease State Healthy State
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The safety and efficacy of the agents and/or uses under investigation have not been established. There is no guarantee that the agents will receive health authority approval or become commercially available in any country for the uses being investigated

References

  1. NCCN Clinical Practice Guidelines in Oncology. B-cell Lymphomas. V 3.2017.
  2. NCCN Clinical Practice Guidelines in Oncology. T-cell Lymphomas. V 2.2017.
  3. Morin RD, et al. Nature. 2011;476:298-303.
  4. Lenz G, Staudt LM. N Engl J Med. 2010;362:1417-1429.
  5. Ghielmini M, Zucca E. Blood. 2009;114:1469-1476.
  6. Gaulard P, de Leval L. Semin Hematol. 2014;51:5-16.
  7. Wong HK. Discov Med. 2013;16:71-78.
  8. Jares P, et al. J Clin Invest. 2012;122:3416-3423.
  9. Demurtas A, et al. Cytometery B Clin Cytom. 2013;84:82-95.