Acute Myeloid Leukemia

Acute myeloid leukemia (AML) is a hematopoietic malignancy that is characterized by the accumulation of malignant blasts in the bone marrow and peripheral blood.1,2 Disease pathogenesis is driven by the accumulation of genetic modifications, including chromosomal abnormalities and somatic mutations, that alter the epigenetic landscape, gene expression, and cellular function.1-4

Explore the 3-D femur cross section to review the pathogenesis of acute myeloid leukemia. Share this interactive resource with your patients to further their understanding of the disease.

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Acute Myeloid Leukemia

Click on the '+' icon over the femur cross section to explore the pathogenesis of acute myeloid leukemia in the bone marrow and peripheral blood.

Use the toggle buttons below to see the bone anatomy and major blood cell types in acute myeloid leukemia compared with healthy state.

Disease State Healthy State

Use the navigation buttons on the right to zoom into areas of interest, zoom out to see surrounding structures, center your view,
draw on a 2D snapshot, or email a 3D interactive link.

Bone Marrow Anatomy

Use the toggle buttons below to see the major cells responsible for hematopoeisis in the bone marrow environment and the presence of leukemic blast in acute myeloid leukemia compared with healthy blood.

Disease State Healthy State

Click on the '+' icon on the malignant myeloblast to view various mechanisms of disease in acute myeloid leukemia.

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DNA Methylation

Use the toggle buttons to see the DNA double helix with an over presence of methyl groups (hypermethylation) on the DNA resulting in suppression of gene expression and dysregulated cellular processes.

Disease State Healthy State
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Molecular Mutations

Use the toggle buttons below to see highlighted mutation in DNA (that translates into a mis-coded protein contributing to disease state) in comparison to DNA with normal composition.

Disease State Healthy State
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Histone Modification

Use the toggle buttons below to see histones forming a closed nucleosome structure due to the presence of methyl groups (histone hypermethylation) attached resulting in abnormal gene expression in acute myeloid leukemia compared with an open nucleosome structure with acetyl groups attached in normal conditions.

Disease State Healthy State
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Abnormal Cytogenetics

Use the toggle buttons below to see a map of chromosomes with cytogenic abnormalities (major contributing factors in the pathogenesis of acute myeloid leukemia) in comparison to normal chromosomes.

Disease State Healthy State
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The safety and efficacy of the agents and/or uses under investigation have not been established. There is no guarantee that the agents will receive health authority approval or become commercially available in any country for the uses being investigated

References

  1. Liesveld JL, Lichtman MA. In: Lichtman MA, et al. Williams Hematology. 7th ed. New York, NY: McGraw-Hill; 2005.
  2. Conway O’Brien E, et al. Adv Hematol. 2014;2014:103175.
  3. Licht JD, et al. Hematology Am Soc Hematol Educ Program. 2005:137-142.
  4. Abdel-Wahab O, et al. Blood. 2013;121:3563-3572.